YOUR GO-TO SOURCE FOR ANALYSIS OF ISSUES AFFECTING THE PHARMA & BIOTECH SECTORS

Now is the time for pharmaceutical manufacturers to review their Open Payments/Sunshine Act internal compliance procedures, data collection forms and databases, and reporting and recordkeeping templates for payments and transfers of value made to healthcare providers. On August 14, 2019, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published a Proposed Rule seeking to expand the Open Payments program, including the number and types of covered recipients and payment categories. As a result, drug manufacturers have at least two reasons to quickly conduct a comprehensive internal examination of their Open Payments program.

The PRC Ministry of Finance has announced it will audit 77 randomly selected drug makers in China, examining the companies' costs and profits to determine the reasonableness of their drug pricing mechanisms, in a bid to drive down medical costs. The audit will include some of the largest domestic drug makers as well as Chinese subsidiaries of three international pharmaceutical conglomerates.

Read the full LawFlash for more insight on the audit's key areas of focus. This initiative marks the first time the Ministry of Finance has launched a nationwide audit specifically targeting pharmaceutical companies, and it could be expanded if evidence is found to suggest issues are prevalent across the industry.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued proposed regulations in February targeting manufacturer arrangements with pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs). These proposed regulations are a direct outgrowth of the administration’s drug pricing blueprint, and if finalized, would revise the Anti-Kickback Statute discount safe harbors that have protected drug manufacturer rebates from potential criminal liability, and affect their agreements with PBMs. However, what many may not realize is that even if the proposed regulations are not finalized, they warrant special attention, as the preamble elucidates CMS’s view on applicability of the current safe harbors to current contracting practices.

Although federal efforts on drug pricing remain at the proposal stage, recently enacted legislation in six states on drug price transparency requires pharmaceutical manufacturers to review and update their approaches to prescription drug pricing and price increases on an ongoing basis to ensure compliance with state laws. Beginning in 2019, some states will impose penalties for noncompliance with reporting obligations. The state statutes raise various concerns, including that they vary from state to state, are often unclear as to what products are covered, and use different calculation methods and evidence to support price increases.

Read the full LawFlash.